INOVATIVE

food intolerance test method

etiketė
ce ivd
ei logotipas
INOVATIVE
food intolerance test method
ei logotipas
ce ivd

The reasons
of food intolerance?

The mechanisms of IgG-mediated food intolerance
are immune-complex based. Partially digested food
components pass into the bloodstream, inducing
the production of IgG antibodies and the formation of
antigenantibody complexes. If the immune complexes
are not sufficiently cleared, they are deposited
in tissues, causing inflammation.

The reasons of food intolerance?

The mechanisms of IgG-mediated food intolerance are immune-complex based. Partially digested food components pass into the bloodstream, inducing the production of IgG antibodies and the formation of antigenantibody complexes. If the immune complexes are not sufficiently cleared, they are deposited in tissues, causing inflammation.

Gastrointestinal tract
Diarrhea, constipation,
stomach upset, abdominal distension,
nausea, irritable bowel syndrome.

Skin
Itching, rash, eczema,
urticaria, acne, psoriasis.

Movement system
Joint pain, arthritis,
muscle spasms.

Symptoms
of food intolerance?

Neuro system
Headache, migraine, anxiety,
depression, chronic fatigue.

Respiratory system
Asthma, chronic runny nose, sinusitis.

Weight problems
Overweight, loss of weight.

ATTENTION!

Symptoms are not life-threatening and can be cured
eliminating the intolerable food from the diet – find out what food!

Symptoms of food intolerance?

Gastrointestinal tract
Diarrhea, constipation,
stomach upset, abdominal distension,
nausea, irritable bowel syndrome.

Skin
Itching, rash, eczema,
urticaria, acne, psoriasis.

Movement system
Joint pain, arthritis,
muscle spasms.

Neuro system
Headache, migraine, anxiety,
depression, chronic fatigue.

Respiratory system
Asthma, chronic runny nose, sinusitis.

Weight problems
Overweight, loss of weight.

ATTENTION!

Symptoms are not life-threatening and can be cured eliminating the intolerable food from the diet – find out what food!

About the test

About the test

Chronic unspecifc symptoms such as diarrhoea, constipation, bloating, nausea, migraine, asthma, eczema, arthritis or fatigue can have many different causes, including reactions to ingested food. It is often difcult to pinpoint the trigger of such symptoms and applying a routine exclusion diet is not always useful due to widely differing patient responses. Testing for antibodies of class IgG against different foods and food additives may help to establish if an immune-mediated food intolerance is behind the health problems. If high concentrations of IgG antibodies against a particular food are identifed, elimination of the offending substance from the diet may help to relieve symptoms. Thus, a comprehensive IgG analysis can help to tailor an individualised approach to diet management.

Food Intolerance

Food intolerance or food hypersensitivity is a detrimental reaction to a food or food additive. It may be caused by enzyme defects (e.g. lactose or histamine intolerance), food pharmacologicals (e.g. glutamate, sulphites, vasoactive amines, additives), toxins (e.g. aflatoxins) or IgG-mediated immune reactions.

Food intolerance differs from immediatetype, IgE-mediated food allergy (type 1 allergy) in that reactions are typically delayed and symptoms tend to be more generalised and chronic. In a classic IgE-mediated allergic reaction, consumption of an offending food results in a rapid release of histamine and immediate symptoms of tingling mouth, hives and swelling of the lips, face, tongue and throat. Severe allergic reactions (anaphylaxis) can lead to acute breathing problems and low blood pressure and can be life-threatening. In IgG-mediated food intolerance, on the other hand, onset of symptoms ranges from several hours to days after intake of the food. The most frequent symptoms are diarrhoea, constipation, bloating, nausea, upset stomach, irritable colon, migraine, asthma, joint disorders, lack of concentration, skin disorders and weight gain or loss.

The mechanisms of IgG-mediated food intolerance are immune-complex based. Partially digested food components pass into the bloodstream, inducing the production of IgG antibodies and the formation of antigenantibody complexes. If the immune complexes are not sufciently cleared, they are deposited in tissues, causing inflammation. Patients with a compromised immune system or an increased permeability of the intestinal wall, so-called leaky gut syndrome, are particularly susceptible to these inflammatory reactions. A leaky gut can be caused by diet-related hyperacidity of the gut flora, medication, infections, preservatives, alcohol, nicotine or stress or further factors. The immune
complexes are preferentially deposited in tissue that is already damaged or inflamed due to e.g. disease, infection or environmental toxins, resulting in augmentation of the inflammation and chronic symptoms.

To relieve symptoms, an elimination diet for a set period of time is usually recommended. The foods for which high IgG antibody concentrations were measured are excluded from the patient’s diet. Improving the gut flora by therapeutic measures can also be considered to reduce or prevent the permeability of the intestinal wall to food antigens.

IgG Subclasses

IgG antibodies have various functions, such as neutralisation of antigens, activation of the complement cascade, flagging of antigens for destruction (oponisation) and phagocyte binding. However, the four different subclasses of IgG play different roles (Table 1). Due to their strong oponisation and complement activation properties, IgG1 and IgG3 and to a lesser extent IgG2 are pro-inflammatory. IgG4 on the other hand has protective, anti-inflammatory properties. IgG4 plays a defensive role in type I allergy, acting as an antagonist of IgE. It induces the release of histamine, although to a much lesser extent than IgE. Therefore, IgG4 antibodies may lead to allergy symptoms particularly in histamine-intolerant patients. However, in chronic inflammatory processes, only the subclasses IgG1, IgG2 and IgG3 are relevant. Since IgG4 antibodies make up only a small proportion of all IgG, testing for total IgG is sufcient to detect clinical relevant titers of proinflammatory IgG1, IgG2, and IgG3 antibodies..

Headaches and Migraine

Migraines have a complex etiology, but it is known that food can play a role in inducing or aggravating attacks. Already in the 1930s the benefts of an elimination diet were demonstrated. In recent studies, elimination diets based on IgG levels have been shown to have signifcant positive effects, such as reduction of the number of headache days, attack count or duration and severity of migraines. A further study revealed signifcant differences in the number of positive results for IgG to foods between 56 migraine sufferers and 56 controls, and elimination diets successfully controlled the migraines of these patients without the need for medication.

Arthritis

Food intolerance has been known for many decades to be a causative factor for developing arthritis. In a study of 22 patients with rheumatoid arthritis undertaking an elimination diet, 91% experienced an improvement of symptoms. All but one of these patients suffered a deterioration of their health status when the reactive foods were reintroduced into their diet.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common functional gastrointestinal disorder with a reported prevalence in the general population of 12 to 22%. The disease is poorly understood, but food intolerance is a major factor in its pathogenesis. Specifc foods can provoke symptoms of IBS, while patients treated with dietary exclusion frequently show symptomatic improvement. In a study on 150 IBS patients, an elimination diet based on raised IgG antibodies resulted in a 26% improvement in the symptom score compared to a sham diet, while relaxation of the diet led to a 24% deterioration. In a further study, 20 IBS patients showed signifcant improvement after food elimination and rotation diet based on serum IgG measurements.

Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

A retrospective study on 112 patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) (79 with Crohn’s disease and 33 with ulcerative colitis) and 266 healthy individuals showed that patients with inflammatory bowel diseases exhibit a high prevalence of antibodies of class IgG against certain foods and that qFIGURE 1: Examples of test parameters in EUROLINE food profles this can be used to establish an elimination diet. Further studies have similarly shown higher levels of food IgG antibodies (e.g. against yeast and processed cheese) in Crohn’s patients than in healthy controls, and demonstrated that nutritional intervention based on circulating IgG antibodies against food antigens can improve symptoms.

Asthma and Atopic Dermatitis

Increased levels of IgG antibodies against foods or food additives have also been observed in asthma and atopic dermatitis. For example, in 125 patients with beef allergy manifesting with asthma, dermatitis or gastrointestinal disorders, beef-specifc IgG and also IgA were signifcantly detected alongside and sometimes in the absence of specifc IgE. An elimination diet ameliorated the symptoms in all of the allergic patients. In another study, signifcantly elevated levels of IgE and IgG were found in a relatively high proportion of patients with atopic dermatitis compared to controls.

Autism

The etiology of autism is not well understood, but dietary restrictions are benefcial and a prerequisite to beneft from other interventions. The main foods for exclusion are milk and dairy products, wheat and other gluten sources, sugar, chocolate, preservatives and food colouring. Individualised IgG and IgE testing can identify other troublesome foods. In a study of 36 infantile autistic patients, high levels of antibodies including IgG against milk proteins were found compared to control children. Behavioural symptoms improved on an elimination diet, indicating a possible relationship between food allergy and autism.

Diagnostic Value of IgG Testing

The diagnostic value of IgG antibody detection for the diagnosis of food intolerance is controversially discussed. Nevertheless, different studies with up to several thousand patient samples have come to the conclusion that the determination of the antibody titer can be a useful tool for the identifcation of food intolerances and for targeted patient therapy. Generally, it could be shown that elimination of those foods against which strong antibody reactions were measured helped to improve symptoms or to promote complete recovery in a statistically signifcant number of patients. A large internet-based study on the diagnostic beneft and clinical relevance of IgG antibodies as a marker qTABLE 1: Properties and abundance of different IgG subclasses of food intolerance concluded that IgG determination provides a clinically useful basis for establishing an elimination diet.

IgG Determination

IgG antibodies against different food and food additives can be easily determined by immunoassay. Immunoblots are particular useful for this application as they allow multiparameter analysis of hundreds of different parameters in parallel, providing an extremely wide-ranging screening (Figure 1). This is especially important in food intolerance, as symptoms tend to be delayed or chronic and may be difcult to link with consumption of a particular food.

Total IgG against 108 or 216 foods and food additives can be analysed simultaneously with a new range of immunoblot profles based on established EUROLINE technology. The foods represented on the strips are divided into categories, encompassing gluten-containing cereals, gluten-free cereals and alternative foods, meats, dairy and egg, fruits, herbs and spices, nuts and seeds, vegetables, legumes, salads, mushrooms, fsh and seafood, and other foodstuffs such as yeasts, honey, coffee and black tea. Only small volumes of patient serum are required for the analysis, just 40 µl for 108 results. By analysing 22 patient samples in one run, 2,376 single results can be obtained in just 4.5 hours. Results are evaluated semiquantitatively using four calibrators corresponding to the WHO reference serum 1st IRP 67/86. To increase productivity further the entire procedure, from sample identifcation and incubation to evaluation and archiving of results, can be fully automated e.g. on the EUROBlotOne device with EUROLineScan software.

Perspectives

The determination of IgG antibodies against food and food additives can contribute to the diagnostic workup for patients with chronic food-related health problems. Although the link between food-specifc IgG antibodies and chronic inflammatory processes has not yet been frmly established, many studies have demonstrated an association between food IgG antibodies and different diseases, and shown that elimination diets based on IgG reactions can help to relieve symptoms. Thus, patients with unspecifc gastrointestinal and other symptoms which cannot be attributed to any known cause may beneft from a comprehensive IgG analysis and a corresponding elimination diet. As with classic IgE allergy tests, IgG results should always be interpreted in the context of clinical observations. Further studies should help to clarify the role of food-specifc IgG antibodies in poor gut health.

List of references

1. Alpay K, Ertas M, Orhan EK, Ustay DK, Lieners C, Baykan B. Diet restriction in migraine, based on IgG against foods: a clinical double-blind, randomised, cross-over trial. Cephalalgia. 2010 Jul;30(7):829-37. doi: 10.1177/0333102410361404. Epub 2010 Mar 10.
2. Arroyave Hernández CM, Echavarría Pinto M, Hernández Montiel HL. Food allergy mediated by IgG antibodies associated with migraine in adults. Rev Alerg Mex. 2007 Sep-Oct;54(5):162-8. Erratum in: Rev Alerg Mex. 2010 Mar-Apr;57(2):49. Echevarría Pinto, Mauro.
3. Awazuhara H, Kawai H, Maruchi N. Major allergens in soybean and clinical significance of IgG4 antibodies investigated by IgE- and IgG4-immunoblotting with sera from soybean-sensitive patients. Clin Exp Allergy. 1997 Mar;27(3):325-32.
4. Aydinlar EI, Dikmen PY, Tiftikci A, Saruc M, Aksu M, Gunsoy HG, Tozun N. IgG-based elimination diet in migraine plus irritable bowel syndrome. Headache. 2013 Mar;53(3):514-25. doi: 10.1111/j.1526-4610.2012.02296.x. Epub 2012 Dec 6.
5. Bentz S, Hausmann M, Piberger H, Kellermeier S, Paul S, Held L, Falk W, Obermeier F, Fried M, Schölmerich J, Rogler G. Digestion. Clinical relevance of IgG antibodies against food antigens in Crohn's disease: a double-blind cross-over diet intervention study. 2010;81(4):252-64. doi: 10.1159/000264649. Epub 2010 Jan 30.
6. Bernardi D, Borghesan F, Faggian D, Bianchi FC, Favero E, Billeri L, Plebani M. Time to reconsider the clinical value of immunoglobulin G4 to foods? Clin Chem Lab Med. 2008;46(5):687-90.
7. Bischoff SC, Herrmann A, Manns MP. Prevalence of adverse reactions to food in patients with gastrointestinal disease. Allergy. 1996 Nov;51(11):811-8.
8. Cai C, Shen J, Zhao D, Qiao Y, Xu A, Jin S, Ran Z, Zheng Q. Serological investigation of food specific immunoglobulin G antibodies in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. PLoS One. 2014 Nov 13;9(11):e112154. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0112154. eCollection 2014.
9. Calderon TE, Ferrero M, Marino GM, Cordoba A, Beltramo D, Muino JC, Rabinovich GA, Romero MD. Meat-specific IgG and IgA antibodies coexist with IgE antibodies in sera from allergic patients: clinical association and modulation by exclusion diet. J Biol Regul Homeost Agents. 2010 Jul-Sep;24(3):261-71.
10. Codina RM, Calderón E, Lockey RF, Fernández-Caldas E, Rama R. Specific immunoglobulins to soybean hull allergens in soybean asthma. Chest. 1997 Jan;111(1):75-80.
11. Drisko J, Bischoff B, Hall M, McCallum R. Treating irritable bowel syndrome with a food elimination diet followed by food challenge and probiotics. J Am Coll Nutr. 2006 Dec;25(6):514-22.
12. Duchateau J, Michils A, Lambert J, Gossart B, Casimir G. Anti-betalactoglobulin IgG antibodies bind to a specific profile of epitopes when patients are allergic to cow's milk proteins. Clin Exp Allergy. 1998 Jul;28(7):824-33.
13. el Rafei A, Peters SM, Harris N, Bellanti JA. Diagnostic value of IgG4 measurements in patients with food allergy. Ann Allergy. 1989 Feb;62(2):94-9.
14. Gaby AR. The role of hidden food allergy/intolerance in chronic disease. Altern Med Rev. 1998 Apr;3(2):90-100.
15. Germano P, Pezzini A, Boccagni P, Zanoni G, Tridente G. Specific humoral response to cows' milk proteins and ovalbumin in children with atopic dermatitis. Int J Clin Lab Res. 1993;23(4):206-11.
16. Haddad ZH, Vetter M, Friedmann J, Sainz C, Brunner E. Detection and kinetics of antigenspecific IgE and IgG immune complexes in food allergy. Ann Allergy. 1983 Aug;51(2 Pt 2):255.
17. Halpern GM, Scott JR. Non-IgE antibody mediated mechanisms in food allergy. Ann Allergy. 1987 Jan;58(1):14-27. Review.
18. Arroyave Hernández CM, Echavarría Pinto M, Hernández Montiel HL. Food allergy mediated by IgG antibodies associated with migraine in adults. Rev Alerg Mex. 2007 Sep-Oct;54(5):162-8. Erratum in: Rev Alerg Mex. 2010 Mar-Apr;57(2):49. Echevarría Pinto, Mauro.
19. Jones VA, McLaughlan P, Shorthouse M, Workman E, Hunter JO. Food intolerance: a major factor in the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome. Lancet. 1982 Nov 20;2(8308):1115-7.
20. Kawaguchi T, Mori M, Saito K, Suga Y, Hashimoto M, Sako M, Yoshimura N, Uo M, Danjo K, Ikenoue Y, Oomura K, Shinozaki J, Mitsui A, Kajiura T, Suzuki M, Takazoe M. Food antigeninduced immune responses in Crohn's disease patients and experimental colitis mice. J Gastroenterol. 2015 Apr;50(4):394-405. doi: 10.1007/s00535-014-0981-8. Epub 2014 Aug 7.
21. Kidd PM. Autism, an extreme challenge to integrative medicine. Part 2: medical management. Altern Med Rev. 2002 Dec;7(6):472-99.
22. Lindberg E, Magnusson KE, Tysk C, Järnerot G. Antibody (IgG, IgA, and IgM) to baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), yeast mannan, gliadin, ovalbumin and betalactoglobulin in monozygotic twins with inflammatory bowel disease. Gut. 1992 Jul;33(7):909-13.
23. Lucarelli S, Frediani T, Zingoni AM, Ferruzzi F, Giardini O, Quintieri F, Barbato M, D'Eufemia P, Cardi E. Food allergy and infantile autism. Panminerva Med. 1995 Sep;37(3):137-41.
24. Mitchell N, Hewitt CE, Jayakody S, Islam M, Adamson J, Watt I, Torgerson DJ. Randomised controlled trial of food elimination diet based on IgG antibodies for the prevention of migraine like headaches. Nutr J. 2011 Aug 11;10:85. doi: 10.1186/1475-2891-10-85.
25. Mullin GE, Swift KM, Lipski L, Turnbull LK, Rampertab SD. Testing for food reactions: the good, the bad, and the ugly. Nutr Clin Pract. 2010 Apr;25(2):192-8. doi: 10.1177/0884533610362696.
26. Nanda R, James R, Smith H, Dudley CR, Jewell DP. Food intolerance and the irritable bowel syndrome. Gut. 1989 Aug;30(8):1099-104.
27. Shakib F, Brown HM, Phelps A, Redhead R. Study of IgG sub-class antibodies in patients with milk intolerance. Clin Allergy. 1986 Sep;16(5):451-8.
28. Shakib F, McLaughlan P, Stanworth DR, Smith E, Fairburn E. Elevated serum IgE and IgG4 in patients with atopic dermatitis. Br J Dermatol. 1977 Jul;97(1):59-63.
29. Volpi N, Maccari F. Serum IgG responses to food antigens in the italian population evaluated by highly sensitive and specific ELISA test. J Immunoassay Immunochem. 2009;30(1):51-69. doi: 10.1080/15321810802571903.
30. Zar S, Benson MJ, Kumar D. Food-specific serum IgG4 and IgE titers to common food antigens in irritable bowel syndrome. Am J Gastroenterol. 2005 Jul;100(7):1550-7.

Dr. Thomas Pfeiffer, Luebeck, Germany
www.medlabmagazine.com • DIAGNOSTICS / FOOD-SPECIFIC IgG TITERS

You can choose testing of 54, 108 or 216 food products for food intolerance

You can choose testing of 54, 108 or 216 food products for food intolerance

Gluten Containing Cereals
Oat flour 54,108
Gluten 54,108
Wheat flour 54,108
Barley flour 54,108
Rye flour 54,108
Spelt 108
Gluten Free Cereals & Alternative Foods
Buckwheat flour 54,108
Corn 54,108
Flax seed 108
Rapeseed
Rice 54,108
Carob
Millet 108
Meat
Duck meat
Horse
Lamb 108
Beef 54,108
Turkey 108
Pork 54,108
Goat
Guinea fowl
Quail
Roe deer
Ostrich
Rabbit
Chicken 54,108
Goose
Dairy & Egg
Processed cheese 54
Sheep’s milk 108
Sheep’s cheese 108
Beta-lactoglobulin (Cow’s milk) 54
Emmental cheese
Cottage cheese
Yogurt 108
Camembert
Cow’s Milk 54,108
Casein (Cow’s milk) 54
Kefir
Egg white (Chicken) 54,108
Egg yolk (Chicken) 54,108
Curd cheese
Mozzarella
Goat’s milk 54,108
Goat’s cheese 108
Butter
Fruits
Apricot 108
Gooseberry
Pineapple 108
Orange 54,108
Watermelon 108
Raspberry
Avocado
Banana 54,108
Strawberry 108
Lemon 108
Date fruit 108
Rose hip
Fig 54
Blackberry
Pomegranate
Grapefruit 108
Black currant
Kiwi 54,108
Pear 108
Litchi
Mango
Blueberry
Cantaloupe
Honeydew melon
Nectarine 108
Apple 54,108
Papaya
Peach 108
Red currant
Raisin
Plum 108
Cranberry
Grape (white/ blue) 108
Cherry 108
Lime
Herbs & Spices
Poppy seed 108
Anise
Hops
Basil 108
Chamomile
Cinnamon 108
Garlic 54,108
Thyme 108
Mustard seed 54,108
Clove
Ginger
Cayenne pepper
Coriander
Caper
Curry 54
Cumin
Dill
Chive
Bay leaf
Marjoram
Mint
Nutmeg 108
Tarragon
Parsley 108
Pepper (black/ white) 108
Peppermint 108
Oregano 108
Rosemary 108
Saffron
Sage
Vanilla 54,108
Nuts & Seeds
Cashew nut 108
Brazil nut
Walnut 54,108
Cocoa bean 54,108
Chestnut
Pine nut
Coconut 108
Cola nut
Hazelnut 54,108
Macadamia nut
Almond 54,108
Pistacia 108
Sunflower seed 108
Sesame 108
Peanut 54,108
Vegetables
Cucumber 108
Olive 108
Artichoke 108
Shallot
Eggplant 108
Green cabbage 54
Bamboo shoots
Brussel sprouts
Broccoli 54,108
Potato 54,108
Chard
Beetroot 108
Zucchini 108
Chili 108
Cauliflower
Chinese cabbage
Horseradish 108
Kale
Pumpkin / Gourd
Carrot 54,108
Fennel
Bell pepper 108
Tomato 54,108
Leek 54,108
Red cabbage 108
Radish
Turnip 108
Liquorice root
Sweet potato
Celery 108
Savoy cabbage
Snow pea
Onion 54,108
Asparagus 108
Spinach 108
Jerusalem artichoke
Vine leave
Legumes
Chickpea
Kidney bean
Lentil 54,108
Broad bean
Soya bean 54,108
Mung bean
String bean 54,108
Pea 108
White bean 54,108
Salads
Iceberg lettuce
Rocket
Corn salad 108
Lettuce 108
Chicory
Mushrooms
Mushroom mix 1 (Oyster & White mushroom, Shiitake, Chanterelle) 54,108
Mushroom mix 2 (Bay Boletus, Boletus) 108
Fish & Seafood
Anchovy 108
Octopus
Oyster
Gilthead seabream
Ginger
Caviar
Haddock
Sea bass
Sole 108
Squid
Swordfish 108
Carp
Crab
Crayfish 108
Prawn 54,108
Salmon 54,108
Pike
Codfish 54,108
Clam 108
Lobster
Turbot
Sardine
Herring
Mackerel
Tuna 54,108
Eel
Trout 108
Ocean perch
Miscellaneous
Agar-agar
Brewer’s yeast 108
Aloe vera
Safflower oil
Black tea 54,108
Coffee 54,108
Baker’s yeast 54,108
Baking powder
Honey 54,108
Green tea
Gluten Containing Cereals
Oat flour 54
Gluten 54
Wheat flour 54
Barley flour 54
Rye flour 54
Spelt
Gluten Free Cereals & Alternative Foods
Buckwheat flour 54
Corn 54
Flax seed
Rice 54
Millet
Meat
Lamb meat
Beef 54
Pork 54
Chicken 54
Dairy & Egg
Sheep’s milk
Sheep’s cheese
Yogurt
Cow’s Milk 54
Egg white (Chicken) 54
Egg yolk (Chicken) 54
Goat’s milk 54
Goat’s cheese
Fruits
Apricot
Pineapple
Orange 54
Watermelon
Banana 54
Strawberry
Lemon
Date fruit
Grapefruit
Kiwi 54
Pear
Nectarine
Apple 54
Peach
Plum
Grape (white/ blue)
Cherry
Herbs & Spices
Poppy seed
Basil
Cinnamon
Garlic 54
Thyme
Mustard seed 54
Nutmeg
Parslay
Pepper (black/ white)
Peppermint
Oregano
Rosemary
Vanilla 54
Nuts & Seeds
Cashew nut
Walnut 54
Cocoa bean 54
Coconut
Hazelnut 54
Almond 54
Pistacia
Sunflower seed
Sesame
Peanut 54
Vegetables
Cucumber
Olive
Artichoke
Eggplant
Broccoli 54
Potato 54
Beetroot
Zucchini
Chili
Horseradish
Carrot 54
Bell pepper
Tomato 54
Leek 54
Red cabbage
Turnip
Celery
Onion 54
Asparagus
Spinach
Legumes
Lentil 54
Soya bean 54
String bean 54
Pea
White bean 54
Salads
Iceberg lettuce
Corn salad
Lettuce
Mushrooms
Mushroom mix 1 (Oyster & White mushroom, Shiitake, Chanterelle) 54
Mushroom mix 2 (Bay Boletus, Boletus)
Fish & Seafood
Anchovy
Sole
Swordfish
Prawn 54
Salmon 54
Codfish 54
Crayfish
Clam
Tuna 54
Trout
Miscellaneous
Brewer’s yeast
Black tea 54
Coffee 54
Baker’s yeast 54
Honey 54
Gluten Containing Cereals
Oat flour 108
Gluten 108
Wheat flour 108
Barley flour 108
Rye flour 108
Gluten Free Cereals & Alternative Foods
Buckwheat flour 108
Corn 108
Rice 108
Meat
Beef 108
Pork 108
Chicken 108
Dairy & Egg
Processed cheese
Beta-lactoglobulin (Cow’s milk)
Cow’s Milk 108
Casein (Cow’s milk)
Egg white (Chicken) 108
Egg yolk (Chicken) 108
Goat’s milk 108
Fruits
Orange 108
Banana 108
Fig
Kiwi 108
Apple 108
Grape (white/ blue) 108
Herbs & Spices
Garlic 108
Mustard seed 108
Curry
Pepper (black/ white) 108
Vanilla 108
Nuts & Seeds
Walnut 108
Cocoa bean 108
Hazelnut 108
Almond 108
Peanut 108
Vegetables
Broccoli 108
Potato 108
Carrot 108
Green cabbage
Tomato 108
Leek 108
Onion 108
Legumes
Lentil 108
Soya bean 108
String bean 108
White bean 108
Mushrooms
Mushroom mix 1 (Oyster & White mushroom, Shiitake, Chanterelle) 108
Fish & Seafood
Prawn 108
Salmon 108
Codfish 108
Tuna 108
Miscellaneous
Black tea 108
Coffee 108
Baker’s yeast 108
Honey 108

Notice: all above listed food products can be found in 216 food product intolerance test palette. Food products that are in 54 and 108 food product intolerance test palettes are marked accordingly.

The test can be performed in one of these laboratories

For information on test costs, contact the laboratory of your choice

The test can be performed in one of these laboratories

For information on test costs, contact the laboratory of your choice

      Please!

      You are welcome to like our Facebook page

      © 2018 All Rights Reserved.